Week 12 Schedule:
Slavery and Suppression


Monday (03/31)

Humor, Schooling, and National Identity in the Early Republic

Before Class: Read this Brief History of Political Cartoons from the University of Virginia's Crossroads site. Then go to the Library of Congress/Harpweek American Political Prints website. If your last name begins with A-D, browse through the 1800-1809 cartoons. E-M, browse through 1810-1819. N-R browse through 1820-29, S-Z browse through 1830-1839. For your decade, what seemed to be the 4-5 main issues or concerns? Who or what were the main targets? Which jokes and visual games still seem funny, and which seem most alien? Pick out one or two from your decade to talk about in class.
Watch the segments from the Films on Demand series The Common Schools, 1770-1890, on Jefferson, Horace Mann, Need for Reform, and The Common Schools. (about 15 min.) You may optionally watch the segments on "Religious Conflict," "Separation of Church and State," and the Issue of Race." Read Guarneri, America in the World, pp. 128-131. Finally, read these excerpts from a review of one of the first U.S. history textbooks ever published and the preface written by the author of another. Please bring a printout of these two documents to class. You may optionally read the short essay by Bill Bigelow, "The Real Irish-American Story not Taught in Schools", Zinn Education Project, 16 March 2014.

A summary of the Wikipedia article on Horace Mann will be posted by Will Cranford and the article on Francis Wayland will be posted by Porter Grant. A summary of Wikipedia article on Romantic Nationalism will be contributed by Matthew Hill. A summary of Guarneri: "American Nationalism and National Identity" will be posted by Christie Hoff. A posting of reflections, connections, and short answer questions will be posted by Charlie Hough. These summaries and reflections will be posted to the course discussion forum. Please refer to the wiki and connections posting instructions before posting.


Wednesday (04/02)

Economic and Social Change in the Early Republic

Read chapter 5: "Material Witness," from Davidson and Lytle, After the Fact in preparation for class discussion. Please bring your book to class. Read Guarneri, America in the World, pp. 145-149. From the Outline of U.S. History's chapter on Formation of a New National Government, read section 13. Analyze this table of patent activity in U.S. regions. Examine these maps of the ratio of capital invested in farms to capital invested in manufacturing, 1860, U.S. canals, 1825-1860, cash value of farms, and dollar value of goods manufactured at home rather than purchased.

A summary of the Wikipedia article on Cult of Domesticity will be posted by Haley Jones and the article on Lowell Mill Girls will be posted by Hilton Kennington. A summary of the Material Witness chapter will be contributed by Briana Mele. A summary of Guarneri: "Expansion, Development, and the World Economy" will be posted by Utkarsh Mishra. A posting of reflections, connections, and short answer questions will be posted by Parker Morrow. These summaries and reflections will be posted to the course discussion forum. Please refer to the wiki and connections posting instructions before posting.


Friday (04/04)

Law and Democracy, and their Discontents

Read this brief history of the Equity Courts of South Carolina. Read the first few paragraphs of Francisco Avalos' brief Introduction to the Mexican Legal System on the University of Arizona law school website, up through the discussion of the 1857 Constitution. Read the official Justice Quebec Historical Note on the Development of the Justice System in Quebec. Please print and bring to class a copy of the Maryland Session Laws of 1838 (excerpts).

A summary of the Wikipedia article on John Marshall will be posted by Nick Ranta and the article on McCulloch v. Maryland will be posted by Daniel Reese. A summary of the Wikipedia article on Chancellor James Kent will be contributed by Lauren Reyes. A summary of the Wikipedia article on Roger Taney will be posted by Tucker Rockett. A posting of reflections, connections, and short answer questions will be posted by Jonah Sheats. These summaries and reflections will be posted to the course discussion forum. Please refer to the wiki and connections posting instructions before posting.

Note: The instructor reserves the right to change any provisions, due dates, grading percentages, or any other items without prior notice. All assignments on this schedule are covered under the university's policy on plagiarism and academic integrity. See the syllabus statement for further details. This page was last updated on 03/13/2014.