Week 12 Schedule:
North America's Napoleonic Age


Monday (11/07)

Purchasing Louisiana and Invading America

Before class: From the Outline of U.S. History chapter on The Formation of a National Government read from section 7: "President Washington" through section 11: "Louisiana and Britain." From the chapter on Westward Expansion, read the subsections on "Extension of Slavery," "Westward,' and "The Frontier, the 'West,' and the American Experience." Read the brief essay No Haiti, No Louisiana Purchase on the Mother Jones website. Then work through the animation of The Invasion of America, paying close attention to land conquests before 1840. (You might also watch to see the moment when Greenville or your home town became part of the non- Indian United States.) Read the Ohio History Central site's brief summary of the Treaty of Greeneville, 1795. Read the letter from President Thomas Jefferson to William Henry Harrison, Governor of the Indiana Territory (1803). Listen to an audio rendition and read the text of Tecumseh's Speech to Indiana Gov. William Henry Harrison (1810). Read the encyclopedia summary of the decisive and enduringly significant case of Johnson v. McIntosh.

Members of the Diamond (Bigham, Cottingham, Dwyer, Hodges, Holweger, Kinney, Leeder, Mcdaid, Patrick, Rinker) team will need to contribute comments. These summaries and reflections will be posted to the course discussion forum. Please refer to the discussion forum guidelines as needed before posting.

Before class: If your team is posting today, consider in your message:
(a) Consider the most significant consequences of the Louisiana Purchase from both the textbook perspective and your own personal context. What confluence of historical forces made this possible? Was it constitutional? How profoundly did this policy change life for those who experienced it? How enduring were its effects, including for you personally?
(c) What seems most mysterious, puzzling, contradictory, or hard to connect to in these sources? What comments do you have about your team's postings? What questions would you pose for the rest of the class?


Wednesday (11/09)

Primary Source Reports and Reviews
The War of 1812;

Your individual primary source project is due via e-mail to your peer reviewers by class time today. Please e-mail a reference copy to the instructor. See the individual project guidelines for important details and requirements. The citation rules will be of special interest.

Before class: From the Outline of U.S. History chapter on The Formation of the National Government, read the section on the War of 1812. You may optionally preview the video from the Canadian talk show The Agenda with Steve Palkin on the topic Who Really Won the War of 1812? with Dr. Bill Fowler, Northeastern U., Peter Macleod, Canadian War Museum, and Rick Hill, Tuscarora, Oral Historian and Chairperson, Six Nations Legacy Consortium, Six Nations Grand River Territory, Ontario.

Members of the Triangle (Craine, Gordon, Koloski, Martinson, McGrath, Nelson, Rawls, Scudder, Thomas, Wood) team will need to contribute comments. These summaries and reflections will be posted to the course discussion forum. Please refer to the discussion forum guidelines as needed before posting.

Before class: If your team is posting today, consider in your message
(a) Who in North America won the War of 1812 and the Napoleonic Wars, and who lost?
(b) What seems most mysterious, puzzling, contradictory, or hard to connect to in these sources? What comments do you have about your team's postings? What questions would you pose for the rest of the class?


Friday (11/11)

Mexico's Break with Spain, the Congress of Panama, the Monroe Doctrine and the Problem of North American Union

Your peer reviews are due via e-mail to your writers by class time today. Please e-mail another copy of your review to the instructor.

Before class: From the Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture's summary of IndoMexico: The Colonial Period, read the subsection near the end on "18th century Colonial Maturity." (You may find the other sections useful, too.) Read this account of Mexican Independence and especially the story of Hidalgo's Grito de Dolores at Texas A&M. If you have taken Spanish, read the text of the Grito de Independencia (1810) at biblioteca.tv. Read this account of Spain's Constitution of 1812 and this brief summary of the Plan of Iguala, 1821 from the Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture. From the Outline of U.S. History chapter on The Formation of the National Government, read the section on the Latin America and the Monroe Doctrine. Read the account of the Congress of Panama, 1826

Members of the Crescent (Barry, Cothran, Hartley, Herndon, Joyce, Nichols, Robbins, Ruffle, Stonecipher, Weir) team will need to contribute comments. These summaries and reflections will be posted to the course discussion forum. Please refer to the discussion forum guidelines as needed before posting.

Before class: If your team is posting today, consider in your message:
(a) Was a united confederation of North American Republics after Mexican independence possible? What advantages and disadvantages would a formal NATO-style alliance or NAFTA-style cross-national economic compact have had for Mexico and the United States in this era?
(b) How did Poinsett's background and life story prepare him to understand Mexican society? What preconceptions and "confirmation bias" are evident in his account? How might Mexican preconceptions and "confirmation bias" in the other direction have affected what they told him and how they understood him?
(c) What seems most mysterious, puzzling, contradictory, or hard to connect to in these sources? What comments do you have about your team's postings? What questions would you pose for the rest of the class?

Note: The instructor reserves the right to change any provisions, due dates, grading percentages, or any other items without prior notice. All assignments on this schedule are covered under the university's policy on plagiarism and academic integrity. See the syllabus statement for further details. This page was last updated on 09/12/2016.